Music » Cd's » Petros Shoujounian

Odzuni hour
Works by Petros Shoujounian (1998)
Homage to Maryvonne Kendergi/an Musician and friend of Art Preview of the CD by Radio Canada.







Odzouni (Name of a village) (1987)
(1' of 14'36")
Performers:
Jean Laurendeau, ondes Martenot; Michele Gagnon, cor / French born; Alain Trudel, trombone; Robert Ellis, basse trombone basse; Robert Leroux, percussions; Alain Cazes, tuba.



Composer's Note: This peace is based on a song of the 7th century, which evoked in me heightened state of power. It made me recreate this jewel of a folk-melody around a solo instrument.






Horovele (1979)
(1' of 6'29")

Jean-Guy Boisvert, clarinet.




Composer's Note: Pastoral songs are an integral part of the folklore of all nations. These melodies live in each country’s daily and innermost lives. They are dialogue with nature expressing its moments of joy and sadness. Pastoral song.




Mashtotz (1982)
(1' of 10'36")

For 2 piano’s
Pierre Jasmin, piano 1; Koyen Lee, piano 2.




Composer's Note: A monk, Mesrop Mashdotz, invented in 405 A.D. an alphabet with 36 characters reproducing the sounds of the Armenian language. An extraordinary invention wich enabled Armenians to take their destiny into their own hands through writing of their unique History and Culture.




Arevagale (Rising Sun) (1991)
(1' of 9'17")

Trio for alto bassoon, cor French horn



Composer's note: Sunrise represents an unending renewed source of life of all human beings, and unfortunately those who banish it from their inner lives live as shadows, sad and colorless. However, those who greet the rising star with enthusiasm, are nourished by the energy of its light, and are enriched with self-confidence, happiness and freedom.






Sassouni (name of mountain range) (1985)
(1' of 12'52")

For two Flutes and Harpsichord
Performers: Robert Lagevin and Lise Daoust flutes; Rejean Poirier, harpsicord



Composer's Note: How small and powerless we feel in presence of immense and inaccessible mountains! Only the shepherds can feel a kinship, as they live most of their lives on their slopes, conversing with them, fearlessly climbing and descending from their peaks, Sassouni in Armenia is a varied chain of Mountains, where each height is either adored by green pastures, dark rocks or eternal glaciers.